WHAT DAY OF THE WEEK WERE YOU BORN?

HOW TO REMEMBER THE CALENDAR


THIS IS AN EXTENDED VERSION OF CHAPTER 6, PG. 202-204 FROM REMEMBER IT!

A neat little trick to remember what day of the week any date will fall on in this year (2018), last year (2017), or next year (2019) is something called the Doomsday Calculation. It’s actually not much memory at all. All you need to memorize are the following lists:

  • 2016 is a 0

  • 2017 is a 1

  • 2018 is a 2

  • 2019 is a 3

  • 2020 is a 5

For the month, remember this list (I’ve included a quick mnemonic to help you):

  • January - 5 (imagine 5 inches of snow in winter)

  • February - 1 (the 1 month that has the fewest days)

  • March - 1 (1 man marching)

  • April - 4 (Aprrrrrrril has an “r”, so does fourrrrrrr)

  • May - 6 (MAY(be) if you’re lucky, you’ll have sex (6))

  • June - 2 (June is way 2 hot)

  • July - 4 (July 4th, Independence Day!)

  • August - 0 (think of a gust of wind blowing through a hole 0)

  • September - 3 (start of the school year, 3 year olds going to pre-school)

  • October - 5 (think of 5 scary ghosts for Halloween)

  • November - 1 (1st cold month of winter)

  • December - 3 (3 kings for Christmas)

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And finally, one last easy list for the days of the week:

  • Sunday - 0 or 7

  • Monday - 1

  • Tuesday - 2

  • Wednesday - 3

  • Thursday - 4

  • Friday - 5

  • Saturday – 6

Okay, check it out. You’re going to have to do a tiny bit of math here (I know, I know! This is a memory book not a math book! Just a little math, okay? The payout is awesome!). Every addition we do, whenever we spill over 7, we go back down to zero (and in our weird world of math, 7 is synonymous with 0). For example, say I have the number 2 and I add 2, that’s 4. Duh. But say I have 4 + 4, that would typically be 8, but that spills over 7 by 1, so my answer is 1. If we start on a bigger number like 28, just divide by 7 and keep the remainder--that’s essentially what we’re doing here. So say we have 28 + 4. I take that god-awful large number of 28 (we don’t like doing math on large numbers, right?) and divide it by 7 and keep the remainder: 0. Now it’s just 0+4, that’s 4.

The calendar date calculation goes as follows:

  • Take the number code for the year

  • Take the number code for the month

  • Take the number of the day

  • Add them together (making sure to always divide by 7 and keep the remainder)

  • Translate your answer, which will be a number 0-6, into a day of the week: Sunday-Saturday.

                        EXAMPLE 1 – Feb. 4th, 2017

  • 2017 is a 1

  • February is a 1

  • 4th is a 4

  • That’s 1+1+4 = 6

  • 6 is a Saturday. February 4th, 2017 was a Saturday.

                       

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EXAMPLE 2 – Dec. 25th, 2019

  • 2019 is a 3

  • December is a 3

  • 25th is a 25, but dividing by 7 and taking the remainder is 3 R 4, so 4.

  • That’s 3+3+4 = 10. Again, divide by 7 and take the remainder, that’s 3. Christmas Day in 2019 is a Wednesday.

Pretty sweet, right? Now for the next few years you won’t ever have to check a calendar, you’ll know almost instantly what day of the week a certain date falls on.

NOTE: One small detail you’ll have to keep in mind are leap years (a year where there is one extra day in the calendar year). 2016 and 2020 are both leap years. For those cases, you need to subtract 1 ONLY IF your month is February or March.

ALL THE CALENDAR DATES

Now what if you want to do any year in history? There is a way to do this, but requires a little more memorization and math. Technically the Gregorian Calendar that we know so well only started in the late 16th century, so anything before that doesn’t really make sense, but we can still apply the following method regardless.

There is a simple code list you need to learn for the century:

  • 1600s/17th Century – 0

  • 1700s/18th Century – 5

  • 1800s/19th Century – 3

  • 1900s/20th Century – 1

  • 2000s/21st Century – 0 

  • 2100s/22nd Century – 5

It repeats every 4 years in case you want to keep going into the future and/or past. The reason we were able to do 2016-2020 in our examples in above without including this code was because the 21st century (2000s) is a 0, so we ignored it in our calculation. But this isn’t the case for other centuries.

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Also, we need to memorize a list for every 2-digit possible year number. In the examples above, I gave you the codes for years that ended in 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20 (for the 21st century), but we need to know all 2 digit year endings. That may sound tricky, but it’s not. There is, alternatively, a way to calculate this on the fly, but I honestly think memorizing them is faster and easier (and heck, you’re a memory expert by now anyways, so why not?). Here is the list categorized by similar code:

  • 0 – 05, 11, 16, 22, 33, 39, 44, 50, 61, 67, 72, 78, 89, 95

  • 1 – 00, 06, 17, 23, 28, 34, 45, 51, 56, 62, 73, 79, 84, 90

  • 2 – 01, 07, 18, 29, 35, 40, 46, 57, 63, 68, 74, 85, 91, 96

  • 3 – 02, 13, 19, 24, 30, 41, 47, 52, 58, 69, 75, 80, 86, 97

  • 4 – 03, 08, 14, 25, 31, 36, 42, 53, 59, 64, 70, 81, 87, 92, 98

  • 5 – 09, 15, 20, 26, 37, 43, 48, 54, 65, 71, 76, 82, 93, 99

  • 6 – 04, 10, 21, 27, 32, 38, 47, 55, 60, 66, 77, 83, 88, 94

As you can see, there are seven possible codes, 0-6 and the years associated with that particular code. My recommended way of memorizing these is by choosing seven big memory journey rooms. Then, with your PAO person, imagine the person matching the code (or room) hanging out in that room. For example, room 0 (perhaps your kitchen, for example), we would picture Abe Lincoln (05), Andre Agassi (11), Arnold Schwarzenegger (16), and everyone else on that list, interacting and living in that room . That way, when you see a 2-digit year, you’ll instantly remember what room they were in and remember the code associated with that room (just make sure to somehow LINK the 0-6 code digit to the room, so you know which room is which number).

OKAY, then what? The process is the same as before except you’re adding two more numbers, the code for the century and the code for the year. Let’s do an example for the whole she-bang:

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EXAMPLE 3 – August 2nd, 1829

  • 1800s/19th century code is a 3

  • 29’s code is a 2

  • August’s code is a 0

  • 2nd is a 2

  • Add it all together (dividing by 7 when you spill over):

    • 3 + 2 + 0 + 2 = 7, dividing by 7 and taking the remainder gives you 0

  • 0 is a Sunday!

EXAMPLE 4 – July 4th, 1776

  • 1700s/18th century code is a 5

  • 76’s code is a 5

  • July’s code is a 4

  • 4th is a 4

  • Add it all together (dividing by 7 when you spill over):

    • 5 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 18, dividing by 7 and taking the remainder gives you 4

  • 4 is a Thursday!

And now you know: the Declaration of Independence was signed on a Thursday!

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